Friday, April 17, 2009

The Tranquil Road In the Marsh

During Chol HaMoed, I took Wilma (who is expressing an interest in photography) down to the salt marsh by Marine Park in Brooklyn to do some shooting.

We went right before sunset, which is a crucial time in photography. The best time to take landscape photography is right by sunrise or sunset. During those times, the sun's light has a golden quality that you don't get at other times. At other times during the day the sun's light is harsh and overly bright, but sunrise/sunset is just perfect.

Here are two shots that I took while in the salt marsh. As always, comments, criticisms and critiques are welcome, encouraged and appreciated.




Canon XSi, 18-55mm lens at 18mm
f/3.5, 1/640 second



Canon XSi, 18-55mm lens at 43mm
f/5.0, 1/500 second

The Wolf

Previous Photos:
Are You Looking At Me?
Sunset Over The Hudson
First Day of Spring
Duck Again!
Llama -- an Unorthodox Picture
Yellow Flower
Koi
Panorama: Empire State
Borei M'Orei HaAish
Orchid
Floral Macro: How Close Can You Get?
Shutter Speed & Light Trails on the Brooklyn Bridge
On The Wings of Gerber Daisies
Sometimes, an Out-of-Focus Shot Works Well Too
The Ghosts Of Grand Central
Third Night
Shooting From A Different Angle
Duck!
Gargantua
Sunflower Arrangement (discussion of lens apertures and depth of field)
Empire (basic discussion of lenses)
Hovering Bee
Sunflower Macro
Statue of Liberty
Trinity Church, September 11, 2008
Manhattan Tulips
Dragonfly

3 comments:

SuperRaizy said...

Do we get to see some pictures that Wilma took?

Unknown said...

First one is STUNNING. (Second one's not bad, either. :) )

Ari said...

Really fine pictures there. Both have lots going for them. Agree that lighting is crucial to good pictures, and keen awareness of it is the mark of a photographer that wants to get it right. That's real dedication, getting up at the crack of dawn. I find that it's the pictures that combine human subjects with landscapes to be trickiest because you're dealing with how the light plays off of *two* subjects.